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Moses and the Power of God

In the church, we’ve come up with all kinds of excuses as to why we lack the power of God.  The one that I’ve been posting about is the notion that until we walk in righteousness, we’ll never experience the move of the Spirit.

This is exactly how the Pharisees viewed the world.  Unfortunately, many of us are walking in the same amount of power they walked in – NONE.

There was a group of former Pharisees who were trying to lead Christians to follow the Law of Moses “if they were truly saved”.  Paul was vehement in his opposition to this movement.  Let’s go back to Second Corinthians, chapter 3, and continue to look at the revelation that he received concerning this teaching.

We are not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face to keep the Israelites from gazing at it while the radiance was fading away.  But their minds were made dull, for to this day the same veil remains when the old covenant is read.  It has not been removed, because only in Christ is it taken away.
2 Corinthians 3:13-14

Here Paul is referring to when Moses came down from the mountain where God delivered the law to him.  The Bible says that Moses’ face shown so brightly with the glory of God that it looked like the sun.  People had to shield their eyes from it.

So that he could be among the people, Moses put a veil, or a cloth, over his face to shield them from the light.  But something else happened.  As Moses was with the people, the glory of God started to fade and grow dim.

At one point, even though the glory was dim enough for people to see without hurting their eyes, Moses left the veil on.  Paul said it was so the people would not see the glory of God fading.  In other words, Moses put on a veil so that the Israelites would not see his spiritual batteries draining.

Moses was a man who walked in great power.  He called down plagues upon Egypt.  He commanded the Red Sea to part.  He obtained water from the rock.  The list of miracles God performed through his hand goes on and on.  Yet, all of Moses power was derived through the law.

On more than one occasion he blew it.  He even missed out on entering the Promised Land because of one of his failings.  As great as his power was, it was only a battery pack compared to what the Holy Spirit offers us today.  What surprises me is that we run to use the same lesser power that Moses used.

We have a better covenant than Moses had.  In my next post I’ll show how trying to live like Moses will actually rob us of spiritual strength.

Question: Why is it popular to think that we can adequately serve God in our own strength?

© Nick Zaccardi 2013

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Posted by on December 26, 2013 in Legalism, Power of God

 

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Reflecting God’s Glory #gloryofGod

Music SmokeAnd we, who with unveiled faces all reflect the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his likeness with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.
2 Corinthians 3:18

In this verse, Paul is referring to Moses.  When he was leading the children of Israel through the desert, they stopped for a while at the foot of Mt. Sinai.  Moses went up to meet with God.  As he spent time in the presence of God, he started to soak in some of the glory.  At one point, upon his return, the people couldn’t look at his face because it shone like the sun.

The glory of God was reflecting off his face.  Moses had to wear a veil until things were back to normal.  It’s interesting that way the Bible relates it.  It sounds like Moses wore the veil so that the Israelites wouldn’t see the glory fading.  His experience was great, but it didn’t last a long time.  He had an incredible encounter with God, but it eventually faded back to the way it was.

Understand this, the Lord has greater plans for us.  The Holy Spirit is working in us to make us like Christ.  Each day we are becoming more and more like Him, if we submit to His plan for our lives.  This is the glory of God in us.

This glory that God is clothing us with is different than that of Moses.  First of all, it doesn’t fade.  It’s a glory that’s always on the increase.  My prayer in the presence of the Lord is that throughout my life people will see more of Jesus and less of me.

This is a wonderful thought.  God is doing greater things in us than He did in Moses!  We sometimes look to the pages of Scripture and wish we were a part of what God did back then.  In reality, there’s no need to go back.  God is working just as powerfully today – if we let Him.

Another aspect of this glory is that we reflect it with unveiled faces.  It’s not a glory that frightens others and pushes them away.  It’s the warmth of love and freedom that draws men and women to the cross.  Don’t ever use your walk with Christ as an excuse to condemn or put down other people.  That’s not what the glory of God is about.

We are here to draw men to Christ.  It’s the love, patience and passion of the Lord that brings people to a knowledge of His grace.  We need to use the same tactics that He does.

What should our goal be?  We must desire to spend time in the presence of this glory.  Let it continue to do its transforming work in us.  By doing this we are making it our goal to reflect more of His beauty. That’s what will attract people to Christ.

Question: How much quality time do you spend in God’s presence?

© Nick Zaccardi 2013

 
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Posted by on August 12, 2013 in Encouragement, Prayer

 

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All You Need is Christ

JesusIn my last post I talked about how Christ has fulfilled the requirements for the promises.  This teaching is carried on throughout the New Testament.  It’s not just a verse pulled out of context, but a scriptural theme that has been all but ignored by the church.

For if those who live by law are heirs, faith has no value and the promise is worthless, because law brings wrath.  And where there is no law there is no transgression.
Therefore, the promise comes by faith, so that it may be by grace and may be guaranteed to all Abraham’s offspring – not only to those who are of the law but also to those who are of the faith of Abraham.  He is the father of us all.
Romans 4:14-16

This is a foundational passage in our knowledge of how the promises are obtained in Christ.  The blessing is received, not by my working to do the requirements, but by faith in the One who has already fulfilled them.

This truth is not only given to us by Paul, but also by Peter as well.

His divine power has given us everything we need for life and godliness through our knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and goodness.  Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature and escape the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.
2 Peter 1:3-4

The phrase through these obviously refers to the glory and goodness of God, not our works of righteousness.  As a matter of fact the implications of this go deeper than we have yet discussed.  According to this verse, the reason God blesses us is so that we might actually be participants, sharers, in His divine nature.  You will not find the call for us to fulfill the requirements of the promises anywhere in the New Covenant.

If that’s true, then what are the promises for?  We can look at it this way; each promise has two halves.  There are the requirements and the blessing.  According to the New Testament, Jesus came to fulfill the requirements of the promises.  Because of His finished work on the cross, we receive the blessing of the promise because we’re in Him.

But when the time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under law, to redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons.
Galatians 4:4-5

What really began to set me free was when I realized that the promises are the rights of sons.  For instance, this means that the promise associated with tithing has been fulfilled.  God rebukes the devourer because I’m a son.  We need the revelation that we now receive the promises based upon sonship.

As I’ve said before, you need the whole truth to be effective.  In my next post I will deal with the most important part of this series.

Question: Why is it so hard for us to accept that Christ has finished this work on the cross?

© Nick Zaccardi 2013

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2013 in Faith, Power of God, The Church

 

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Excellence – From the “Musts” to the “Oughts”

FlyingHow far into the realm of the excellent are you venturing?  In my last post I looked at a sobering statement that Jesus made to His disciples.

“So you also, when you have done everything you were told to do, should say, ‘We are unworthy servants; we have only done our duty.”
Luke 17:10

If all you’re doing in your life and ministry are the things you’re supposed to do, then you’re unprofitable in the kingdom of God, according to the Lord.  There are always things that we must do or that we’re expected to do.

The word unworthy is derived from a Greek word that means, not ought.  The thought is that you are not what you ought to be.  To break into the realm of the excellent you must break through the “musts” and enter into the “oughts.”

Those who are not only doing what they have to do, but have found a way to do what they ought to do, are considered to be walking in the excellent.  When a person goes beyond the expected in his or her walk with the Lord we marvel at their spirit of excellence.

What does that mean to me?  I must stop saying, “I ought to have…”, “I ought to do…”, or “I ought to be…” then with the next breath say, “But I have so much I need to do; I can’t.”  When you develop the spirit of excellence, the Holy Spirit is now free to work in you to accomplish what wasn’t expected.

As excellence starts its work in you, you can tap into God’s “excellent power,” His “excellent grace,” and His “excellent love.”  You’ll find out that God has all the resources you need to fulfill the call to excellence that He’s placed inside of you.

In II Corinthians 12:7, Paul talks about being the recipient of excellent revelations.  He would not have received these had he not been walking in excellence.  Galatians 1:13 says that before he was saved, Paul excelled at persecuting the church.

Everyone else was persecuting Christians in the normal way.  Paul, however, went above and beyond the call of duty.  He dragged people out of their homes, and if they tried to move away, he even tracked them to other towns.  Once saved, He carried over this same spirit of excellence into his work for Christ.  That’s why the Holy Spirit entrusted him with all the revelation that he received from the Lord.

But we have this treasure in jars of clay to show that this all-surpassing power is from God and not from us.
II Corinthians 4:7

The word all-surpassing is the Greek word hyperballoexcellent.  This excellent power does not come from our own strength.  Don’t ever take the credit for the excellence in your ministry.  The glory belongs to God.

Walking in the spirit of excellence is one of the earmarks of the power of God in your life, showing that you hear from God and are obeying His voice.

Question:  What are some of the marks of God’s excellence in your life and ministry?

© Nick Zaccardi 2013

 
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Posted by on May 6, 2013 in Spirit of Excellence

 

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The Foundation for Revival

FireI have said that the United States desperately needs a revival.  What is that?  Is it a church full of weeping, “falling down under the power of God”, or huge crowds on Sunday morning?

Is it something we plan into our schedules?  “Revival Meetings the first week of December.”

The truth is that it’s not something we put on, but a work that God performs in us.  It’s a special presence of Christ revealing Himself to our society.

I believe that revival is birthed out of desperation.  When we reach the end of what we can do, all we can rely on is the work of God in us.

It’s kind of like the condition of Israel as they prepared to leave Mt Sinai in the book of Exodus.  They had already turned from God before Moses had even come down from the mountain with the law.

Now God has cleansed the camp and they are about to move out.  They are headed for the Promised Land.

Then Moses said to him, “If your Presence does not go with us, do not send us up from here.  How will anyone know that you are pleased with me and with your people unless you go with us?  What else will distinguish me and your people from all the other people on the face of the earth?”
Exodus 33:15-16

Now there’s a desperate prayer!  What if the modern church prayed like this and meant it?  Most churches would close their doors the first week.

Unfortunately, we just go on with the show.  We’ve learned how to experience growth without the move of God.  A great music team and a charismatic preacher is all you need for success.

We need to learn that growth doesn’t mean that God is in the work.  It grieves me to say it, but if the Holy Spirit left us today, 90% of churches would be unaffected.  Much of the church in America is leaning on the arm of flesh to sustain it.

We need the presence of the Lord.  What else will distinguish the church from any other good social program?

The key is transformed lives.  That’s the proof of the power of God.  When Christ works through His people, we don’t remain the same.

Then Moses said, “Now show me your glory.”
Exodus 33:18

This is the prayer of desperation that needs to go up from God’s people.  We must put aside our goals, and seek the glory of God in our lives.  If He does the work, then He gets the glory.

It’s time for revival in our nation.

Question: How desperate are you for a move of God in our nation?

© Nick Zaccardi 2013

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2013 in Revival

 

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Reflecting God’s Glory

2 Corinthians 3:18
And we, who with unveiled faces all reflect the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his likeness with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.

In this verse, Paul is referring to Moses.  When he was leading the children of Israel through the desert, they stopped for a while at the foot of Mt. Sinai.  Moses went up to meet with God.  At one point, upon his return, the people couldn’t look at his face because it shone like the sun.

The glory of God was reflecting off his face.  Moses had to wear a veil until things were back to normal.  He had an incredible encounter with God, but it eventually faded back to the way it was.

Understand this, the Lord has greater plans for us.  The Holy Spirit is working in us to make us like Christ.  Each day we are becoming more and more like Him.  This is the glory of God in us.

This glory that God is clothing us with is different than that of Moses.  First of all, it doesn’t fade.  It is a glory that is always on the increase.  My prayer in the presence of the Lord is that throughout my life people will see more of Jesus and less of me.

Another aspect of this glory is that we reflect it with unveiled faces.  It is not a glory that frightens others and pushes them away.  It is the warmth of love and freedom that draws men and women to the cross.

Spend some time in the presence of this glory.  Let it continue to do its transforming work in you.  Make it your goal to reflect more of His beauty.

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2012 in Daily Thoughts

 

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